Investing in Ontario’s energy advantages

Ontario’s energy plan should focus on its energy advantages and enhance its publicly owned assets.

They’re the best way to cost-effectively lower GHG emissions, secure decades of reliable, affordable electricity and help grow the local economy.

hydroelectric

Hydroelectric

Remaining sites are more remote and more expensive requiring transparent, comprehensive cost/benefit analyses before proceeding.

biomass

Biomass

Expand the use of Ontario’s low-carbon, renewable biomass fuel at the Thunder Bay Generating Station and convert OPG owned generators at Nanticoke and Lambton Stations to biomass and natural gas.

natural-gas

Natural Gas

Ontario’s natural gas-fired stations are best suited to respond during peak demand periods as they can quickly ramp up generation to effectively back up intermittent renewables. Relying on carbon emitting natural gas-fired generation as baseload generation is costly and dramatically increases GHG emissions.

wind-and-solar

Wind and Solar

Independent reviews show that Ontario’s investments in wind and solar generation have helped create temporary surplus generation and significantly higher electricity rates. Expert analyses suggest it is not to Ontario’s advantage to subsidize the cost of building more wind and solar generation.

nuclear

Nuclear

Refurbish Ontario’s reactors and extend Pickering Nuclear Station operations by four years to 2024.

transmission-and-distribution

Transmission and Distribution

Effective maintenance programs and upgrades to Ontario’s integrated transmission and distribution network ensures efficiency and reliability.

conservation

Conservation

While using less electricity can help meet our electricity needs and offset carbon emissions, Ontario must be prepared for a rise in demand resulting from a growing economy and population and the electrification of the transportation and buildings sectors.

emerging-technologies

Emerging Technologies

As with any advancement, emerging energy technologies require testing and evaluation to determine the overall costs and benefits, including impacts on existing systems, consumers and the environment. Many new technologies, like energy storage, are only at the demonstration stage of development. Future investments should be subject to transparent, comprehensive, cost/benefit analyses.

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